9 Common Myths About the Danger of Lead Paint

9 Common Myths About the Danger of Lead Paint

Myth #1: Lead paint is not used anymore. Lead paint is also used for hundreds of industrial applications often on metal surfaces and are sometimes found on imported products in the U.S.

Myth #2: The U.S. has regulations in place banning the use of lead paint. Very few countries have completely banned all uses of lead paint is still in use in the U.S. for industrial applications.

Myth #3: Lead paint in homes and schools is not a big problem as you can easily remove it. However, if the work is not performed by certified contractors then the removal of lead paint can create a more hazardous environment and result in higher exposures to building occupants.

Myth #4: Lead paint is only a problem when it is damaged or deteriorated. Although deteriorated lead paint is a problem, even normal weathering of lead paints on exterior surfaces contributes to lead contamination of soil, exterior dust, water, and air.

Myth #5: Only residential paint is a problem, as children don’t get exposed to industrial paints. Both children and adults are exposed to lead paint through industrial applications used on roads, highways, steel structures, industrial buildings, automobiles, and other vehicles, and farm equipment. Exposures result when these paints deteriorate and contribute to dust and soil contamination, or when the paint is removed during routine maintenance.

Myth #6: Lead paint only impacts children’s health. Adults can be overexposed to lead during the course of applying, disturbing, and removing lead paint. These exposures can be very significant, and dozens of studies have documented the increase in workers’ blood lead levels from these sources.

Myth #7: Lead paint is not used anymore. Lead paint is also used for hundreds of industrial applications often on metal surfaces and are sometimes found on imported products in the U.S.

Myth #8: The U.S. has regulations in place banning the use of lead paint. Very few countries have completely banned all uses of lead paint is still in use in the U.S. for industrial applications.

Myth #9: Lead paint in homes and schools is not a big problem as you can easily remove it. However, if the work is not performed by certified contractors then the removal of lead paint can create a more hazardous environment and result in higher exposures to building occupants.

A photo of peeling paint

What Baltimore Homebuyers Need to know About Lead Paint

Baltimore banned lead paint in new housing in 1950 and the State of Maryland banned lead paint in 1978. That doesn’t mean that lead paint is no longer a problem and properties built before the ban still have to pass dust sample tests, showing that the levels of lead in the dust are below federal standards. The property may still have lead paint; the paint was just not chipping or peeling when the inspector was there. The paint could chip or peel later and have lead hazards.

A good home inspector knows that older homes built before 1978 have a high risk of lead paint. At Old Line Home Inspections, we also know that more damage can be done by improper removal and can advise homeowners as to the best course of action to take to make their home safe. If you have any questions please contact Andrew Winnard at Old Line Home Inspections at (410) 236-3027 or click here to schedule an appointment.